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U.S. Group Calls For Designating India Priority Foreign Country Email this page
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Washington: The influential U.S. Chamber of Commerce today asked the Obama Administration to designate India as a Priority Foreign Country, the worst classification given to foreign countries that "deny adequate and effective" protection of intellectual property rights.
"We hope that designating India as a Priority Foreign Country will generate a much-needed dialogue and engagement between the U.S. and Indian governments to strengthen the IP environment in India," Mark Elliot, executive vice president of U.S. Chamber's Global Intellectual Property Center, told PTI, after the chamber submitted its recommendation to the U.S. Trade Representatives.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce in its 2014 Special 301 Submission specifically highlights India as a country with particular challenges with respect to IP protections.

"As such we recommend the Office of U.S. Trade Representative to designate India as a Priority Foreign Country," Elliot said.

Under the U.S. Trade Act, a Priority Foreign Country is the worst classification given to "foreign countries that deny adequate and effective" protection of intellectual property rights (IPR) or "fair and equitable market access" to U.S. persons relying upon IPR protection.In 2013, Ukraine was designated as a Priority Foreign Country.

In its report to the U.S.TR, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce alleged over the past two years, the IP environment in India has deteriorated rapidly, making India an outlier in the international community.

"While the then-President of India declared this decade to be India's 'Decade of Innovation' in 2010, India's policies are inconsistent with the former President's rhetoric," the report said.

India has the weakest IP environment of all countries, according to both the 2014 and 2012 editions of the Chamber's International IP Index, which maps the IP environment in 25 countries around the world based on existing international standards and best practices, it said.

The studies found that the continued U.S.e of compulsory licenses, patent revocations and weak legislative and enforcement mechanisms raise serioU.S. concerns about India's commitment to promote innovation and protect creators, the report said.

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